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Garlic mustard high in nutrients abundant in N.E Ohio

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a biennial flowering plant in the Mustard family, Brassicaceae. It is native to Europe, western and central Asia, and northwestern Africa, from Morocco, Iberia and the British Isles, north to northern Scandinavia, and east to northern India and western China (Xinjiang).[1] In the first year of growth, plants form clumps of round shaped, slightly wrinkled leaves, that when crushed smell like garlic. The next year plants flower in spring, producing cross shaped white flowers in dense clusters. As the flowering stems bloom they elongate into a spike-like shape. When blooming is complete, plants produce upright fruits that release seeds in mid summer. Plants are often found growing along the margins of hedgerows, giving rise to the old British folk name of Jack-by-the-hedge. Other common names include Garlic Root, Hedge Garlic, Sauce-alone, Jack-in-the-bush, Penny Hedge and Poor Man's Mustard. The genus name Alliaria, "resembling Allium", refers to the garlic-like odour of the crushed foliage.It is a herbaceous biennial plant (sometimes an annual plant) growing from a deeply growing, thin, white taproot that is scented like a horse-radish. Second year plants grow from 30100 cm (rarely to 130 cm) tall. The leaves are stalked, triangular to heart-shaped, 1015 cm long (of which about half being the petiole) and 59 cm broad, with a coarsely toothed margin. In biennial specimens, first-year plants appear as a rosette of green leaves close to the ground; these rosettes remain green through the winter and develop into mature flowering plants the following spring. The flowers are produced in spring and summer in button-like clusters. Each small flower has four white petals 48 mm long and 23 mm broad, arranged in a cross shape. The fruit is an erect, slender, four-sided pod 4 to 5.5 cm long,[3] called a silique, green maturing pale grey-brown, containing two rows of small shiny black seeds which are released when the pod splits open. Some plants can flower and complete their life-cycle in the first year. A single plant can produce hundreds of seeds, which scatter as much as several meters from the parent plant. Depending upon conditions, garlic mustard flowers either self-fertilize or are cross-pollinated by a variety of insects. Self-fertilized seeds are genetically identical to the parent plant, enhancing its ability to colonize an area where that genotype is suited to thrive.[4] Garlic mustard has been classified as Magnoliopsida. The leaves, flowers and fruit are edible as food for humans, and are best when young. They have a mild flavour of both garlic and mustard, and are used in salads and pesto. They were once used as medicine. and is pact with vitamins and minerals

Northern Ohio Bow Fishing Tournament

The Northern Ohio Bow Fishing Tournament will be held on Saturday, May 17th at the West Branch State Park. The Tournament begins at 8:00 a.m. You can Pre-register for a $10.00 donation, or pay $15.00 on the day of the event. Registration/Check-in will be at the West Boat Launch on Knapp Road the day of the shoot. For more information, contact Mike Ballash: (440) 227-6756 or go to www.geaugabowmen.com For park rules or camping information call: (330) 296-3239 or go to www.westbranchstatepark.com

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